Michaela Wright, marine biology senior, relaxes in bed and studies for finals. Wright is currently attending classes online in Branson, Mo. “It’s been frustrating with everything being online, but I push through the frustration and get things done no matter if I feel like it or not,” said Wright. (Contributed photo)Taylor Rodriguez, computer science junior, is working of some new graphics for the Collegian. Rodriguez attended the semester online in his apartment in Winfield. “I have managed to stay relatively on track and have not failed anything yet so I must have done something right. The only thing that sucks is that my physical art classes like painting and ceramics suffered as a part of not being able to meet up,” said Rodriguez. (Taylor Rodriguez/Staff photographer)Molly Just, campus minister and director of discipleship, takes her workspace outside. “The rest of my semester was a mix of challenging, fun and full of learning curves. With COVID-19, we not only had to figure out how to keep going with chapel but also had to figure out how to do that best online. I spent a lot of time coordinating with students – getting videos, and seeking to be creative. I will admit that I am glad for the respite of summer. It will give all of us some time to catch our breath after having to transition to out new realities. All in all, I am really proud of how the Builder family handled this challenging.” (Contributed photo)Kristin Mueller, elementary education senior, shares her study spot while attending online classes from Camp Horizon in Arkansas City, KS. When talking about her experience with the second half of the spring semester being online, she said, “The rest of the semester was okay. Some of my classes were hard to adjust to; however, I still got it all done and am glad to be wrapping up the semester.” (Contributed photo)Lauren Sieh, communication junior, uses the kitchen table as her temporary classroom. Sieh is currently based in Coweta, OK. (Lauren Sieh/Staff photographerSarah Hallinan, assistant dean of students, sits at the dining room table in her home in Winfield to get some work done. Hallinan sometimes pulls up a small side table in front of a leather rocking chair to work. “While at home, I have been more productive while working on new and returning student housing assignments with less distraction. However, I miss interacting with students in person.” (Contributed photo)Emily Berry, communication senior, is working on her stained glass assignments from home. Berry has been attending online classes from her home in Cimarron, KS. “Online classes were a bit stressful because I had a few classes that you needed to be on campus to do. I am more of a hands-on learner and struggle when I cannot learn the subject in person, but I was able to get the hang of it after a few days. I was also working when I did not have classes so I had the stress from work as well as classes especially when I was given some assignments that would take a lot of my time and have to have it finished by the next class meeting.” (Emily Berry/Staff photographer)

By Lauren Sieh
Staff reporter

While COVID-19 runs its’ course through the world, many schools and businesses have been put into a tough situation.

Southwestern College made the choice in late March to move classes to an online forum. Many students, faculty and staff started to work from homes.

Temporary classrooms and offices became seats at the kitchen table, a spot outside on the porch or zooming from their bed in their bedroom.

Some shared their frustration with the move to online. Even with the difficult transition many founds ways to persevere.

Lauren Sieh is reporting on this story from her home in Coweta, Oklahoma.