UPDATE; February 20, 2017:

Four of the five students involved in the recent off-campus arrests have had their cases dropped.

Coby Barham, Kaleb Ervin, Brian Kiprotich, and Samuel Denike have all had their cases dropped according to the District Attorney’s Secretary.

Max Lopez is the only student of the five that has not had his case dropped. His scheduled court date is Wednesday, Feb. 22.

Garrett Chapman is a senior majoring in communication. You may email him at garrett.chapman@sckans.edu

 

 

By Tanner Carlson and Garrett Chapman
Staff reporters

Sunday, January 15, 2017 five students were taken into custody for various charges at 12:10 a.m. at 3500 E. 9th Ave. in Winfield, KS. The students were pulled over for having illegal tags on a 2009 black Hyundai Genesis.

Coby Barham was taken into custody for possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, transporting an open container, and an illegal tag. Barham was released on bond.

Max Lopez was taken into custody for possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, interference with a law enforcement officer, minor in consumption, and transporting an open container. Lopez was released on bond.

Kaleb Ervin was taken into custody for possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, and transporting an open container. Ervin was released on bond.

Brian Kiprotich was taken into custody for possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, and transporting an open container. Kiprotich was released on bond.

Samuel Denike was taken into custody for possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia, and transporting an open container. Denike was released on bond.

Being a private institution, Southwestern College will be performing their own investigation on each student’s case.

“We can’t comment on individual student conduct cases.” Sarah Hallinan, assistant dean of students, said, “I can tell you, that students are responsible for their behaviors on and off campus.”

The Southwestern student conduct is completely separate from any city, state, or federal law. The schools investigation will include its own hearing processes due to their student conduct and their own burden of proof.

Hallinan explains burden of proof as, “Preponderance of evidence is 51 percent more than likely this occurred.”

“This county may find all these guys responsible for that, and we may not,” said Dan Falk, dean of students.

After the school gathers required information, evidence, and interviews they will determine with due process if these students are guilty or not.

Hallinan said, “If we think a violation occurred, we will charge the students with an alleged violation.”

 

Tanner Carlson is a junior majoring in communication. You may email him at tanner.carlson@sckans.edu
Garrett Chapman is a senior majoring in communication. You may email him at garrett.chapman@sckans.edu